No compensation for clubs or leagues.
FIFA tells Europe it will have to put up with the changes.

FIFA has confirmed that it has no intention of paying compensation to clubs and leagues unhappy about plans to play the 2022 Qatar World Cup in November and December.

It also said it would not issue an apology for the inconvenience the tournament will cause to those leagues which need to be resecheduled.

A FIFA taskforce recommended on Tuesday that the 2022 World Cup take place in winter to avoid Qatar’s hot summer temperatures.

On Tuesday European Clubs’ Association chairman Karl-Heinz Rummenigge said Europe’s clubs would seek financial compensation, but Valcke was in no mood for compromise when he spoke after a meeting of a FIFA task force in the Qatari capital Doha.

“There will be no compensation,” said FIFA secretary general Jerome Valcke. “There are seven years to reorganise.”

FIFA’s executive committee will meet in Zurich next month to confirm the taskforce’s recommendation.

The task force made a provisional recommendation for the tournament to start on November 26, ensuring an enforced break on the domestic European leagues.

Valcke also suggested that a 2022 World Cup final on 23 December was the favoured date. This, despite, complaints from the Premier League chief executive, Richard Scudamore, that the timing would play havoc with England’s traditional festive club programme,.

But Valcke says European governing body UEFA and other confederations are keen on Friday, 23 December, although 18 December remains a possibility.

Valcke also confirmed the 2022 World Cup will be four days shorter as a “concession” to leagues and clubs – 28 days instead of the usual 31 or 32 – and that the 2023 Africa Cup of Nations will move to June from January.

Valcke admitted the situation was “not perfect” but added: “Why are we talking about compensation? It’s happening once, we’re not destroying football.

“Why should we apologise to the clubs? We have had an agreement with the clubs that they are part of the beneficiaries. It was $40m (£26m) in 2010 and $70m (£45m) in 2014. We are bringing all our people to enjoy the sporting and financial results of the World Cup.”

Meanwhile, it was also announced the 2021 Confederations Cup will not be held in Qatar.
Valcke said the tournament will be played “in an Asian country”, but Qatar had been ruled out because it was too hot.

The tournament is traditionally used by the World Cup hosts as as a dry run for the following year’s tournament.