Fabio Capello is stepping down after Euro 2012, so who will replace the Italian as England manager? See the best odds on every candidate here.

Zinedine Zidane says his son has yet to decide whether to play for France or Spain’s under-16 team and that the most important thing for the 15-year-old Enzo is that he succeeds in his studies.

After speculation in the Spanish press that Enzo Zidane would soon represent Spain at junior level, Zidane said neither France nor Spain has yet called up his son to play, and “it’s all for the better.”

In an interview with TV channel France 24, Zidane also said Enzo has inherited his technical skills after spending hours playing football for fun together.

“When I look at him, I see myself,” Zidane said. “Today I don’t want to speak about (his future). He is just a kid who enjoys playing football. He is passionate and this is a good thing. The most important thing for us is that he’ll succeed at school first and then he’ll do what he likes.”

The head of the Spanish under-16 team reportedly plans to call up Enzo, whose mother has Spanish origins.

Zidane, the former Juventus and Real Madrid playmaker who won the 1998 World Cup and the 2000 European Championship with France, decided to stay in Madrid after ending his career following the 2006 World Cup.

His son has impressed observers with his skills while playing for Real’s junior team. He was named after the former Uruguay and Marseille forward Enzo Francescoli, Zidane’s childhood hero.

Fabio Capello is stepping down after Euro 2012, so who will replace the Italian as England manager? See the best odds on every candidate here.

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