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Holland, who top group nine, host Scotland in their latest World Cup 2010 qualifier this Saturday. See all the BestPrice match betting here.

Wigan chairman Dave Whelan has hit out at Newcastle counterpart Mike Ashley claiming he is responsible for the club’s current plight.

Ashley took over in the North East in June 2007 and initially enjoyed a warm relationship with the club’s supporters, only for relations to sour after the departure of Kevin Keegan as manager.

With just eight games remaining, Newcastle are currently in the Premier League relegation zone and according to Whelan, Ashley must carry the can for the club’s current problems.

Whelan and Ashley have recently been involved in a dispute over business matters, with the Wigan chief having set up JJB Sports in the 1970s before selling in 2007, and the Magpies chief owning the rival Sports Direct retail chain.

“When I first went there just after Mike Ashley had bought it he turned up in the boardroom in a pair of jeans, a pair of trainers and a replica shirt,” Whelan said.

“Immediately he did that, the club’s gone.

“You don’t do things like that in football. He’s got no class whatsoever.

“He’s representing Newcastle United who were such a proud club.

“I immediately knew the supporters may want to have a pint with him on the terraces but basically he was not Newcastle through and through. The Newcastle fans know that.

“You can’t get a Tottenham fan buying Newcastle and letting people thinks he supports them.

“It’s not right, there’s no pride left in the club.

“I think he’s got what he deserved. You don’t go into a football club as big and proud as that and lower the standards.”

Holland, who top group nine, host Scotland in their latest World Cup 2010 qualifier this Saturday. See all the BestPrice match betting here.

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